Living Simply

Minimalism + Marriage

When Jordan and I got engaged (story here), we started the journey of joining our lives together.

When we decided to join our lives together as one, we were agreeing to take care of one another as we would want to be taken care of, we agreed to a life-long promise of listening and loving and making our relationship work through the good and the bad.

We agreed to support each other’s dreams and goals.

We decided that no matter what, we had enough in our relationship with God and in our marriage.

We adopted a minimalist mindset for our marriage, and it has benefitted us more than we thought possible. Here’s how:

Minimalism + Money

For over the past year, Jordan and I have been stewarding our finances in preparation for our marriage.

We have the necessities in mind: rent, groceries, car payments, etc.

But we have dreams to travel. We have joined our mindsets together and realized that minimalism will make way for us to be disciplined with our money and create the life that we both want to live.

Minimalism + Mind/Body/Health

Like I stated earlier, minimalism creates a mindset that says “I have enough,” but it also makes space for us to use our money in different ways–ways that better us. Less mindless spending means more intentional purchases

Less mindless spending means more intentional purchases that better our health, such as food. Being picky and ruthless in your diet will make a huge overall difference in your health. Being alert and energized has a lot to do with what you put in your body. Skipping the purchasing of loads of cheap food and refining your grocery list to a smaller, more tailored and intentional list of healthy options will show you how you can eat well and spend wisely.

Minimalism will also help redefine what you spend the bulk of your time doing. It causes you to take a step back and evaluate the influence of your daily decisions. You will begin to weed out the activities that don’t inspire you or keep your body in good health and replace them with activities that do.

Minimalism + Making Decisions

Now when invitations pop up, or if we are just trying to decide what to cook for dinner, we are able to make better decisions together because our mindset and focus are going in the same direction.

We ask ourselves: what makes more sense in regards to our time and finances? Where are we putting our effort and energy into right now, and does this decision reflect that?

I encourage every couple to explore more into the idea of minimalism in their marriages, or their dating relationships.

When minimalism is adopted into a couple’s life:

The arguments over spending minimize.

The money lost over pointless spending diminish.

The time used doing mindless activities decrease.

And the quality of life is restored.

 

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Living Simply

The Contentment Challenge

Back in January of this year, I ran across this blog post by one of my favorite bloggers. And it changed my life. Here’s how:

Prior to running across said blog post that changed my life, I was becoming really interested in minimalism and ready to take whatever kind of leap that catapulted me into the minimalist community.

I was reading Do Less by Rachel Jonat and pumping myself up about simplifying my life in every area.

But I kept hitting a wall. I wanted the “look” of a minimalist, but that required me to go after this idea of a perfect wardrobe, sleek electronics, and decorative clean lines. I was unsatisfied with what I had, but I wanted less, but I also didn’t want to give anything up.

When I read Hannah Brencher’s post, something clicked.

For 3 months, I took on the challenge of being completely content with what I own and not buying a single thing (outside of personal necessities) for 3 months. No leisurely strolls around Target, no going out to eat (instead, eating the food provided in my meal plan at my university), and no Internet browsing for needless things.

I bought my necessities that week (make-up, hygiene products, etc.) that would last me a few months, and I faced the challenge head-on. For the few weeks following my original decision to stop buying unnecessary things, I had to explain my reasoning to so many people I felt like I was doing something weird. The main question most people asked was, “how in the world are you going to last 3 months?”

But I lasted 3 months. In fact, I lasted a lot longer. It became a mindset. I learned that to be content in such an unsatisfied world is a brave and sometimes lonely thing to do. Sure, I didn’t order a drink when I went out to coffee shops with friends, but it really didn’t matter to me. My mind had gone from being so needy of new things, nicer clothes, a newer phone, to realizing what I had to the fullest extent.

I became more thoughtful with my spending.

I was less stressed about what to wear.

I noticed I had a lot more free time to put towards experiences.

I gave up discontentment and spent my time seeking out new places to put my energy into. I learned that a lot of fulfilling things are free, like just being outside and taking into account how beautiful creation is. It competes for nothing. Contentment looks real simple, actually. I was given control over how things were going to affect me instead of the other way around. It was a reboot to what I learned about possessions slowly and over time. It was necessary and life-changing.

I would encourage everyone to try this challenge at least once in their life. Let yourself experience 3 months without the pressures of consumerism. It sounds dramatic, but until you experience it for yourself, you won’t realize how much freedom you’re missing out on. It is incredibly freeing, and you’ll learn a thing or two about yourself and how amazing your life actually is.

Once you need less, you will have more.

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